Tag Archives: Featured

2nd Annual Beer & Wine Torpedo Garden

A trip to the King Street Art Festival isn’t complete without a visit to the Art Center. Enjoy a glass of craft beer or wine while exploring all three floors of artists’ studios. Meet the artists and find original art created on-site. Recharge and refresh with exhibitions, games, and music.

Thanks to our vendors: Port City Brewing, Sonoma Cellar, LostBoy Cider, and America’s Favorite Gourmet Popcorn.

 

 

 

 

RSVP Here

All Weekend in the Grand Hall

Saturday

  • 12:30–1 p.m. Studio 33: Chris Erney
    Fins & Feathers: Grinding Details in Stainless Steel
  • 1:30–2 p.m. Studio 337: Alvena McCormick
    Acrylic Paint Layering Techniques
  • 2–2:30 p.m. Studio 25: Jamaliah Morais
    Asian Calligraphic Landscape Painting
  • 2:30–3 p.m. Studio 226: Dana Lehrer Danze
    Pottery Wheel
  • 3:30–4 p.m. Studio 328: Sermin Ciddi
    Contemporary Miniature Painting
  • 4–4:30 p.m. Studio 329: Nancy Ramsey
    Oil & Cold Wax Painting

Sunday

  • 12:30–1 p.m. Studio 224: Rosemary Covey
    Woodblock Printing without a Press
  • 1–2 p.m. Studio 337: Guy Jones
    Activity: Drawing with Imagination
  • 2–3 p.m. Studio 3: Vita Sims
    Activity: Stencil Painting
  • 3–3:30 p.m. Studio 223: Natalie Abrams
    Mold Making
  • 3:30–4 p.m. Studio 4: Tsolmon Damba
    Contemporary Mongolian Painting
  • 4–4:30 p.m. Studio 313: Christine Cardellino
    Transferring Photographic Images to a Painting

 

Photo by Matthieu Joannon on Unsplash

Post-Grad Artist Talk: Kim Sandara

As her three-month post-grad residency comes to a close, Kim Sandara talks with moderator Leslie Mounaime, Curator of Exhibitions at the Torpedo Factory Art Center, about her experiences during her time at the Torpedo Factory. Hear her speak about how her residency inspired her work and process, what she’s done during her time, and what she will be doing next.

Join us in the main hall of the Art Center for her talk and then a mingle in the Post-Grad studio #319 after the talk is over.

RSVP on Eventbrite

About Kim

Kim Sandara is a queer, Laotian/Vietnamese, artist based in Northern Virginia. In 2016, she graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art, with a BFA in General Fine Arts. Accessibility to art is a key part of her creative process. Her overall focus is to encourage empathy, wonder, self-reflection, and connection. During the residency, she will continue documenting her coming out story. She will create a stop-motion animation promoting her graphic novel aimed at helping parents of color to understand and accept their queer children. She hopes contribute proceeds from sales to National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance and True Colors Fund.

Kim has worked at the Hirshhorn Gallery and the Phillips Collection, observing how art is presented and digested by its audience. She is presently a guide at Glenstone Museum’s Emerging Professionals Program, where she facilitates discussions about contemporary art. She has shown work at 7Drum City, Uptown Arthouse, SAMASAMA, Womxn Fuck Shit Up, and Arts x Action.

45th Anniversary Salute

On this date in 1974, Torpedo Factory Art Center officially opened its doors to the public. Join us for an afternoon honoring 45 years of history and toast to the founding artists of the Art Center.

Several special guests will honor the sapphire anniversary, with remarks starting at 3:30 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Donald Beyer and Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson will both present proclamations. Marian Van Landingham, the Art Center’s foundress, will speak and meet with visitors.

To commemorate the anniversary, guests can create a silkscreen print to take home, visit select studios for artist demonstrations and craft hands-on projects. Light refreshments will be provided.

In 1974, Van Landingham, through her role in Alexandria’s Bicentennial Committee, proposed to renovate the derelict plant into usable studio spaces. The City agreed and hired her as director in what was expected to be a three-year experiment.

Almost a half-century later, the Art Center is a cultural destination in Alexandria with 165 visual artists, 82 studios, and seven galleries, including Target Gallery, the Art Center’s contemporary exhibition space. It is managed by Alexandria’s Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities through the Office of the Arts.

This year also marks the building’s centennial year on the waterfront. To mark the combined anniversaries, the Art Center will host an Anniversary Ball on Saturday, November 16, from 7 to 10 p.m.

Pictured: Marian Van Landingham speaking at the Art Center Dedication during Alexandria’s Bicentennial Celebration, July 13, 1974.

The Late Shift: Autumn Evenings

Second Fridays through October 

The Art Center’s signature evening series features eclectic art and activities. In among three floors of open artists’ studios, find gallery receptions, stimulating artist talks, pop-up performances, hands-on projects, lively music, and more. 

Celebrate the start of autumn with the Late Shift’s “Autumn Evenings.” Artist Alice Fornari provides origami-inspired projects in partnership with Target Gallery’s “Habitats” exhibition. Reception for Zia Palmer’s “Las Orillas del Mundo” in the Mason Arts Project Studio. DC Zine Fest artists show their zine-making process and talk about the local zine scene. Kim Sandara concludes her residency in the Post Graduate Studio and collects queer and LGBTQI ally stories from visitors for her “You’re Not Alone” project.

Pre-registration Requested 

Register Now

Target Gallery

Exhibition: Habitats

Target Gallery‘s current group exhibition explores the relationship between humans and nature creating a dialogue on the impact that we make on the earth and our environments.

North Hall

Artist Project: Alice Fornari (IG: alicefolds)

Alice Fornari, one of the artists in Target Gallery’s Habitats, invites visitors to fold individual modules from recycled paper which will be attached together to create one large completed piece by the end of the event. Stop by her table to hear more about her process and contribute to the artwork.

South Hall

Hands-On Project: Kim Sandara, Summer Post-Grad Resident (IG: kimthediamond)
You’re Not Alone: Queer Stories of the DMV Community
Come share queer stories with artist Kim Sandara! Anonymous stories will be collected to circulate in the community. Descriptions can take on any tone/mood the storyteller wants to convey. All are welcome to share, queer and ally stories alike.

Meet the Artists: DC Zine Fest (IG: dczinefest)
The DC Zinefest is an independent event designed to provide a space for zine-makers, self-published artists, and writers to share their work with each other and the Washington, D.C., community. Meet some of the contributing artists, see their works, talk about the Fest, and learn how to join this growing network. Organized by Katana Lippart.

Grand Hall   

Demonstration and Artist Talk: Deirdra Hazeley (IG: artbydeehaze)
July 2019 Visiting Artist Deirdra Hazeley returns to the Art Center for one night to provide an art demonstration and answer questions about her summer experiences as an artist-in-residence.

Hands-On Project: Autumn Evenings Mural
Take part in an interactive mural project. Highlight your favorite autumn moments with friends and family.

Mason Arts Project Studio

Reception: Zia Palmer: Orillas del Mundo (IG: _ziapalmer)
Las Orillas Del Mundo is a photography installation that investigates the longing for a place that once was. The work explores emotional ties to a homeland by capturing the desolate landscape that defines an ancestral history. The motivation in creating this series is driven by the shifting landscape of identity and how a sense of place can be abstracted or distorted over time. The abstraction of history, time, and identity is explored through photography, genealogy, family photos, and found objects. The question of what makes us who we are becomes the lens for re creating a sense of belonging and identity.

Studio 5

Hands-On Project: The Omi Collective (IG: theomicollective)
Rainbow Swirls
Stop by Studio 5 for hands-on projects with the artists and see their brand-new mural design on the studio floor. Swirl through curated color, sound, and aroma–luring you through the mystical heart’s journey down the rainbow path- a dreamscape filled with Naomi Christianson’s Unicorns, Michael Fischerkeller’s cosmic truths, and Fierce Sonia’s fractal queens. There will be lounge with squishy cushions where you can try on love adornments from Naomi’s upscaled art denim, deep dive into your hearts path with a tarot reading with Chantel R. Bennett, or swirl into healing your inner rainbow with creatrix Cierra Ross’s reiki consultation.

 


About the Artists

Alice Fornari is a self-taught modular origamist from Brooklyn, NY, currently based in Washington, DC. She is especially interested in integrating sustainability into her work, and does this by utilizing the patterns found in recycled paper and plastic. Alice’s background is in evolutionary biology and natural history collection preservation. She has a BS in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and an MA in Museum Studies and currently works as a Museum Technician at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. A critical dimension of Alice’s work: social and environmental justice. Alice has showcased her planar modules at the American Museum of Natural History’s annual Holiday Tree for the past three years, constructing flora and fauna inspired by modular origami forms, as well as in Target Gallery’s current “Habitats” show.

Kim Sandara is a queer, Laotian/Vietnamese artist based in Northern Virginia. A graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, Sandara’s narrative and abstract works encourage empathy, wonder and self-reflection. Sandara’s work has been featured in many D.C. community events including a recent workshop at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She is currently working on a graphic novel on her coming out story.

Deirdra Hazeley is from Brooklyn, NY, and resides in Washington, DC.  She creates realistic and abstract portraits of Black men and women. Hazeley explores beauty and dignity in her portraits while including decorative elements of West and East African mark making.  She uses acrylic, oil and watercolor paint. Hazeley is a graduate of Cornell University, Florida International University and Columbia University. She studied abroad in Spain with the School of Visual Arts. She was a resident artist at the Art Students League Residency at Vytlacil and the Vermont Studio Center. She was a participant artist in the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition Iggy Pop Life Class: A Project by Jeremy Deller, which traveled to the Royal Academy of Arts in London, UK. Her drawings from the aforementioned shows are in the Brooklyn Museum’s collection. Hazeley’s art has been shown at Brooklyn College, ARTs East New York and DC Arts Center. She was a participant in Torpedo Factory Art Center’s Visiting Artist Program and is a resident artist at Palette 22.

During her residency in M.A.P.S., Katana Lippart will concentrate on a series that will help resolve the broken ties between self and home. This has held a significant amount of weight in her life and continues to shape how she perceives the world. Katana hopes to be able to share printmaking, book arts, and collage with the surrounding community over the course of this program. These mediums have given her the necessary platform to reflect on both personal and collective narratives relating to home.

The DC Zinefest, occurring annually, features self-published zinesters from DC and surrounding areas. The Fest is a one-day independent event designed to provide a space for zine-makers, self-published artists, and writers to share their work with each other and the Washington, D.C., community. It is always FREE & Open to the Public! All Ages! The DC Zinefest is also a designated safer space, which means that it is intended to be a welcoming, engaging and supportive environment free of oppressive actions, behaviors, and language. Stay tuned on our social media for more upcoming ZineLabs and events!

The Omi Collective provides artist-inspired fashion and design products to consumers seeking unique, authentic, and artful items to inspire, and add to, their personal style. They maintain mindful and conscious support for the artists who create them.

Factory Flow Morning Yoga – September

Find inner peace and creativity in this morning series focused on art, health, and imagination. Led by certified instructor Alejandra O’Connor, sessions are judgement-free for all skill levels.

Please arrive 15 minutes early. Bring a mat, towel, and water bottle.

Suggested donation: $10 at the door.

Reserve your spot

About the Instructor

Alejandra O’Connor began regularly practicing yoga in 2014 as a way to exercise while joining her Indonesian host family in Ramadan fasting. After Ramadan was over, she was hooked on how the movement and breath combined to allow space for stillness. She earned her 200 hour adult teaching certification from Latitude Yoga Co. in Stafford, VA in May 2017; and her Kidding Around Yoga certification in March 2018. Currently she primarily teaches children. As such, her adult classes are combination of play, dance, and quiet meditation.

The Late Shift: Habitats

Second Fridays through October

The Art Center’s signature evening series features eclectic art and activities. In among three floors of open artists’ studios, find gallery receptions, stimulating artist talks, pop-up performances, hands-on projects, lively music, and more.

Celebrate the opening of Habitats in Target Gallery. This group exhibition that explores the relationship between humans and nature, creating a dialogue on the impact that we make on the earth and our environments. Gallery talk is at 8 pm.

Pre-registration Requested

Register Now

Download the night’s Schedule and Map


Receptions

Target Gallery:Habitats

RECEPTION: 7–10 pm
ARTIST TALK: 8 pm
This group exhibition that explores the relationship between humans and nature creating a dialogue on the impact that we make on the earth and our environments. Juror: Ellyn Weiss, DC-based artist and curator.

Site 2: Art Enables

RECEPTION: 7 – 9 pm
Art Enables is a gallery and vocational program creating opportunities for artists with disabilities to make, market, and earn income from their original and compelling work. Stop by Site 2 to view a collection of works created by artists from the greater DC/Virginia/Maryland community. Curated by Allie Frazier, Gallery Director of Art Enables.

Mason Arts Project Studio (Studio 8): Zia Palmer and Katana Lippart

RECEPTION: 7 – 10 pm
ARTIST TALK: 9 pm

Stop by the Mason Arts Project Studio (MAPS) to view the latest art projects created by students of George Mason University’s School of Art. This ongoing collaboration will highlight projects by current MFA candidates, recent GMU graduates, and School of Art faculty to facilitate open dialogue and community growth in the greater DC Metro Area creative arts scene.


Hands-On Projects

“Sometimes I Dream in Laos” by Kim Sandara

Post-Grad Studio 319: You’re Not Alone

Queer stories of the DMV Community
Led by Kim Sandara, Summer Post-Grad Resident
Kim Sandara is a queer, Laotian/Vietnamese artist based in Northern Virginia. She is currently working on a graphic novel on her coming out story. Share queer stories in a safe and welcoming space. All are welcome to share, queer and ally stories alike. Descriptions can take on any tone/mood the storyteller wants to convey. Anonymous stories will be collected to circulate in the community.

Grand Hall: The Work of Veronica Melendez

Curator Gabrielle Tillenburg will be on hand to talk about the summer installation artworks of Veronica Melendez, an artist focused on the Latinx experience in the greater DC Metro area. Alongside answering questions about the artworks, Tillenburg will provide an interactive activity for folks to write responses based on prompts highlighting cornerstore bodegas and the relationships they form with local communities.

3rd Floor Landing: Circle of Energy Communal Spirit Stick

Led by Donna Lee Gallo and Pamela E. Underhill
Circle of Energy is an installation featuring healing sticks by Donna Lee Gallo and talking sticks by Pamela E. Underhill. Visitors are invited to work together to create one large spirit stick that will represent all of the community that attends the >Late Shift. The finished stick will be added to the artwork to represent the “togetherness” of everyone working as one to create a peaceful and beautiful spirit stick.

Studio 5: Rainbow Swirls with The Omi Collective

The Omi Collective provides artist-inspired fashion and design products to consumers seeking unique, authentic, and artful items to inspire, and add to, their personal style. They maintain mindful and conscious support for the artists who create them. Stop by Studio 5 for hands-on projects with the artists and see their brand-new mural design on the studio floor. Swirl through curated color, sound, and aroma–luring you through the mystical heart journey down the rainbow path – a dreamscape filled with Naomi Christianson’s Dragons, Unicorns, and Mermaids, Michael Fischerkeller’s cosmic truths, and Fierce Sonia’s fractal queens. There will a lounge with squishy cushions for you to get lost in a collaborative art canvas, try on love adornments with Naomi’s upscaled artful denim, deep dive into your hearts path with a tarot reading with Sanam Emami, or swirl into healing aroma with creatrix Essential Botany’s self love potion station.

Grand Hall: Paper and Plastic Creatures and Habitats Mural

Led by Natalie Ledesma
Developed by the Art Center’s public programs intern and GMU School of Art student Natalie Ledesma, this projects invites visitors to take paper and plastic recyclable materials and create an animal all of their own. This project will bring awareness of the dangers of pollution the materials cause to the environments. Then, join other visitors to create a long mural in the main hall and draw about the importance of homes or habitats.


Meet and Greet

Grand Hall: The Mason Mural Brigade

Developed at George Mason University, The Mason Mural Brigade commissions original, large-scale, and multimedia works of art by professional and student artists for the GMU campus and the greater community. They strive for a community where visual art is a source of information and fosters a more tolerant community. Through these mural experiences, they form an understanding of how individual voices and creative visions can influence societies.

Habitats

Opening Reception: Friday, August 9
Exhibition Juror: Ellyn Weiss, DC-based artist and curator

The newest group exhibition Habitats in Target Gallery, the contemporary exhibitions space of Torpedo Factory Art Center, poses the question, “What makes a habitat a home?”

The artists’ response to this founding question explores the relationship between humanity and our surrounding environments. How are we impacting the world around us? Is this relationship symbiotic or destructive? The selected artists address these questions and raise new ones. Work is presented in a diversity of media, from sculpture and photography to video and virtual reality.

The juror for this exhibition was Ellyn Weiss, a D.C.-based independent artist and curator, who formerly practiced environmental law. She selected 22 works by artists from across the United States, six of whom are local to the region.

“Each of the 22 works of art here is a truly individual response to the challenge to respond to the meaning of habitat,” she said. “From the threatening to the violent to the charming and poignant, the work spans a wide range of emotions and invites reflection on our human place in the universe of living things.”

Participating Artists:
Laura Ahola-Young, Pocatello, ID
Corinne Beardsley, Brooklyn, NY
Betsy Byers, St. Peter, MN
Ceci Cole McInturff, Alexandria, VA
Matt Coombs, Philadelphia, PA
Adam Crosson, New Orleans, LA
Delna Dastur, McLean, VA
Emily Dzieweczynski, Minneapolis, MN
Pam Eichner, Silver Spring, MD
Alice Fornari, Washington, DC
Sarbani Ghosh, Brooklyn, NY
Christina Hunt Wood, Delhi, NY
Kamille Jackson, Woodbridge, VA
Yasemin Kackar-Demirel, Westchester, NY
Pamela A. MacGregor, McClure, OH
James Maria, Reading, PA
Michael Marks, Minneapolis, MN
PJ Mills, Miami, FL
Daniele Piasecki, Martinsburg, WV
Nancy Ramsey, Alexandria, VA
Lisa Sanders, Newark, NJ
J.D. Scott, Santa Fe, NM
Bethany Springer, Fayetteville, AR

Corinne Beardsley’s Torso plays on this relationship between humanity and nature by carving out an abstracted human torso from gypsum. The sculpture looks like an excavated form. It recalls the natural cycle of life and how our bodies will one day be reconstituted back into the earth.

Adam Crosson’s video If At All is a meditative examination of relationship between humans and the Mississippi River, where the dichotomy of natural resources and industry come to a head as public and private interests collide.

The exhibition also features an interactive VR video/painting collaboration Melting the Grotto by artists Betsy Byers and Emily Dzieweczynski. It puts the viewer headlong into a swiftly melting glacier as a commentary on the destruction of natural resources.

About the Juror
Ellyn Weiss is a Washington, DC-based visual artist in two and three dimensions, as well as an independent curator, with studios in Mt. Rainier, MD and Truro, MA. She has had more than 25 solo or featured shows and has participated in numerous juried and curated exhibitions. Ellyn works in a wide variety of media; the materials used in recent shows include wax, oilbar, dry pigment, wire, plastic dip and tar. Ellyn’s work has for many years been inspired by the imagery of biological and natural structures. Much of her work love the past decade deals with the effects of global climate change.

Ellyn is committed to engagement with the world around her. Prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1997, she practiced environmental law. Her work included serving as General Counsel to the Union of Concerned Scientists, which she still serves as a member of the Board of Directors. She is also on the Boards of the Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill and was a founding Board member of the Touchstone Foundation for the Arts.

About Target Gallery

Target Gallery is the contemporary exhibition space for the Torpedo Factory Art Center. The gallery promotes high standards of art by continuously exploring new ideas through a variety of visual media in a rotating schedule of exhibitions. The gallery is open daily from 10 – 6 pm and until 9 pm on Thursdays. More information is available via torpedofactory.org/target.

Image Credit: Corinne Beardsley, Torso (detail), 2018. Gypsum cement and acrylic paint.

Factory Flow Morning Yoga – August

Find inner peace and creativity in this morning series focused on art, health, and imagination. Led by certified instructor Alejandra O’Connor, sessions are judgement-free for all skill levels.

Please arrive 15 minutes early. Bring a mat, towel, and water bottle.

Pre-register for one or more classes or pay at the door for drop-in.

Cost: $10; $15 at the door

Pre-Register Now

Online registration is through RecTrac, hosted by the City of Alexandria. Use the shopping cart icon to add class(es) to your order. Follow the prompts to log in using your existing account or create a new household account before continuing with your registration.

About the Instructor

Alejandra O’Connor began regularly practicing yoga in 2014 as a way to exercise while joining her Indonesian host family in Ramadan fasting. After Ramadan was over, she was hooked on how the movement and breath combined to allow space for stillness. She earned her 200 hour adult teaching certification from Latitude Yoga Co. in Stafford, VA in May 2017; and her Kidding Around Yoga certification in March 2018. Currently she primarily teaches children. As such, her adult classes are combination of play, dance, and quiet meditation.

The Late Shift: King Street Circus

The Art Center’s signature evening series features eclectic art and activities. In among three floors of open artists’ studios, find gallery receptions, stimulating artist talks, pop-up performances, hands-on projects, lively music, and more.

Hands on projects, music, craft beer, and more light up Torpedo Factory Art Center’s Late Shift. With projects by contemporary and emerging artists Julia Kwon, Danielle Dravenstadt, Kate Fitzpatrick, Emily Fussner, Lilia GestsonKerry Hentges, Jen Lillis, and Dawn Whitmore.

Pre-registration Requested

FEATURED ARTISTS 

INSTALLATIONS & PERFORMANCES:
to Break / to Mend

Guest-Curated by Danielle Dravenstadt

What does it mean to heal? This collaboration explores the ways in which artists unearth a lost wholeness, mend brokenness, order chaos, and make the invisible visible. In to Break / to Mend, artists explore the human instinct to connect with the ground as a means of survival, respite, and healing.

Featured Artists:

  • Kate Fitzpatrick
  • Emily Fussner
  • Kerry Hentges
  • Lilia Gestson
  • Jen Lillis
  • Dawn Whitmore

ABOUT THE PROJECTS AND PERFORMERS

KATE FITZPATRICK: TIDE 

Kate Fitzpatrick

Kate Fitzpatrick is a painter, MFA candidate, and Graduate Lecturer at George Mason University. Her work challenges the viewer to think about the nature of language, symbols, and meaning. Instead of replicating known letters or rearranging words to make new meaning, she uses marks to simultaneously deny transfer of information and invite the viewer to create new meaning.  The viewer observes the “postscript” and becomes the foreigner, experiencing a new language for the first time. The unintelligible calligraphy functions as writing and it is our inability to unlock the information contained in those marks which invites a dialogue about the nature of language and meaning. We can enjoy the formal qualities of the letters and how they’re put together, but cannot fathom their intent.  Because of this, we can appreciate the text as a container but are left with letters that don’t function as they should. Fitzpatrick’s postscript invites a dialogue about the relationship between symbols and meaning that viewers can use to create a new reality.

Project Statement: “Ocean tides embody the process of movement through the rise and fall of sea levels that are caused by the powerful forces of the moon, sun, and the rotation of the earth.  Although we have no control over these ebbs and flows, they are structured patterns that can be predicted. I sometimes think of the ocean tide during yoga practice when using the vigorous breathing technique, Ujjayi Pranayama.  This breathing method is used throughout the yoga practice to warm up the body and keep the oxygen flowing to all parts of the body (prana). To practice Ujjayi, you completely fill your lungs by slightly contracting your throat and breathe out through your nose, which creates an “ocean sound” that helps me stay present and self-aware.”

 

EMILY FUSSNER

Installation by Emily Fussner

Emily Fussner is an interdisciplinary artist with a BS from Gordon Weselyan University and an MFA from George Mason University. She was born in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, and grew up equal parts overseas and in the US.  Her work questions what it means to care for the stepped-over and to pause for the fleeting.  How does one mend and fill a gap? Or materially archive the immaterial? Her site-responsive practice seeks the overlooked, often filling and casting cracks in the ground with paper pulp, or tracing and capturing shapes of sunlight and shadow. By highlighting and translating overlooked spaces and fragile patterns, what is usually mundane and peripheral can envelop and confront us in new ways, inviting us to re-examine our relationship to our own daily landscape.

 

LILIA GESTSON: HEALING GARDEN

Lilia Gestson

Lilia Gestson grew up in the suburbs of DC where she cultivated her love for the visual and performing arts. As a performing artist, Lilia pursued a career in dance with Pittsburgh Ballet Theater. During her recovery from an injury, she discovered her love for the visual arts and shifted her artistic focus to fine art. She is currently living in Gaithersburg Maryland and pursuing a Fine Arts degree at Montgomery College. Most recently, she has shown her work in the Solo Lab 5 Performance Art Festival (2019), the Olly Olly Talk Show (2019), and Montgomery College’s Student Exhibition (2019). Her work has also been shown in the Print Club of Rochester’s Political Impressions international juried exhibition (2018), the VisArts NextGen5.0 juried exhibition (2018), Montgomery College’s Student Exhibition (2018), and the Baltimore Jewelry Center’s Radical Jewelry Makeover exhibition (2017). Lilia was awarded the Rockville Art Department Endowed scholarship in 2018 and is the president of Montgomery College’s Student Art League. She is currently working at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden where she continues to cultivate a love for contemporary art.

Project Statement: “This artwork will be an interactive fiber arts piece that will use the essence of nature to create a healing garden. As a performative work, Healing Garden will lay on the ground as a carpet and visitors will be encouraged to interact and contribute to the garden. Healing Garden will start as a flat lace carpet and each visitor will be encouraged to write a healing wish on a small naturally hand dyed square that will then be sewn as a 3D abstract flower onto the lace carpet. The sewing will take place either by the visitor or myself in real time during the duration of the event. As more visitors contribute there will be more flowers added and the healing wishes will be interconnected with energy form nature. The naturally dyed fabric and lace will symbolize the grounding energy from nature and will hold these wishes inside them, allowing visitors to acknowledge their pain and give it to nature for healing.”

 

KERRY HENTGES: HANGING TOGETHER

Close-up of “Collaborative Thoughts – Step 2” by Kerry Hentges

Kerry Hentges is a mixed media artist who utilizes found objects, writing, thread, and book art to confront anxiety. While anxiety motivates her studio practice, the practice in turn helps her understand and ease anxiety. According to Hentges, art is a way of understanding oneself and meditating on what is important. Hentges’ current work focuses on understanding thought pattern and emotion. According to Hentges, “thought is inherently contradictory, humans experience many emotions at once.” Hentges explores this contradiction in her work through materials like wood, nails, and string and she studies the patterns they make together. The goal of her work is for others to analyze their own thoughts and find  a source of healing.

Project Statement: “Hanging Together  is an on-site thread installation depicting the complexity of thoughts. Hentges takes a simple fabric sheet and stitches complex patterns representing different emotions. From anxious to calm, the threads work their way down the tapestry and ground themselves in an orderly pattern at the bottom. The bottom threads weave towards other works in the gallery that help viewers explore concepts of caring and healing.”

JEN LILLIS

Jen Lillis


Jennifer Lillis
is an artist and administrator in Northern Virginia with an MFA from George Mason University and a BA from Marymount University in 2012. Her work focuses on deconstruction, transformation, and ritual of landscape, language and material through her studio practice. She is the co-founder of ELEMENTS and Gallery Manager at the McLean Project for the Arts.

DAWN WHITMORE: SLEEP

Detail of “Sleep,” by Dawn Whitmore

Dawn Whitmore is a Washington, DC based interdisciplinary artist whose work focuses on myth and identity. She received a BFA from the Corcoran School of Art in 2005. She is presently an artist in residence at the Arlington Arts Center in Arlington, Virginia. Her work has been shown nationally including: the Corcoran Gallery of Art (DC), Mesa Museum of Contemporary Art (AZ), Hemphill Fine Arts (DC), Area 405 (MD), Spring Gallery (NY) and published in The Guardian, The Washington Post and The Virginia Quarterly Review. She is a recipient of the Artist Fellowship Grant from the DC Commission on the Arts.

Project Statement: “Sleep is an installation that mimics the decent and journey into sleep as the mind begins to downshift to process memories and emotions as well as healing the physical body. The soundscape begins by making audible the chattery processing of the mind (stages 1-2 of our sleep cycle), then the deep coma-like state where physiological healing occurs (stages 3-4) and finally the vivid and dream intensive REM sleep.  According to Dr. Robert Stickgold of Harvard Medical School, ‘we are now living in a worldwide test of the negative consequences of sleep deprivation.’ Sleep enable both the body and mind to heal – without proper sleep we would die. This work is an auditory journey into the underworld of sleep and where we mend both emotional and physical ailments.”  


ABOUT THE GUEST-CURATOR

“The Milk, the Lime” by Danielle Dreavenstadt

Danielle Dravenstadt is an interdisciplinary artist, specializing in photography, with an MA from the Maryland Institute College of Art and a BA from Furman University. She is a photography instructor at the School of Art at George Mason University. Her work explores, challenges, and transforms the ordinary through photography, painting, printmaking, and installation. She transfigures mundane and transient moments into arresting and immutable artifacts, revealing nuanced perceptions of the quotidian.


EXHIBITIONS & ARTIST PROJECTS

Target Gallery: Julia Kwon

TARGET GALLERY
SOLO EXHIBITION: JULIA KWON 

PROJECT: 7–10 pm  

Target Gallery presents interdisciplinary artist Julia Kwon. Kwon creates sculpture and textile art that explore reductive representation, othering, and objectification, in relation to ethnicity and gender as a Korean American woman. Kwon was chosen from nearly 130 artists from across North America for this annual competitive opportunity for a solo show. 

“Collective Quilting,” hands-on project with Julia Kwon

The jury panel for this opportunity was: Sandy Guttman, DC-based independent curator; Michael Matason, Gallery Manager of DC Arts Center; and Terence Nicholson; DC-based artist.

From 7-10pm, the artist will be present to Collective Quilting in the Grand Hall directly in front of Target Gallery.

Collective Quilting is an ongoing, collaborative project where participants contribute to a large communal quilt while discussing issues regarding gender and ethnicity. Participants may bring in remnant fabrics from their own lives or embroider images and texts to share their thoughts and personal experiences of objectification. Each work is added to a larger patchwork in support and solidarity with others. The project has been hosted at Textile Arts Center (2017), Montgomery College (2018), IA&A at Hillyer (2018), Korean Cultural Center in DC (2019), and NARS Foundation (2019).

 

“Sometimes I Dream in Laos” by Kim Sandara

STUDIO 319
OPENING RECEPTION: KIM SANDARA

Summer Post-Grad Resident
RECEPTION: 7–10 pm

Kim Sandara is a queer, Laotian/Vietnamese artist based in Northern Virginia. A graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, Sandara’s narrative and abstract works encourage empathy, wonder and self-reflection. Sandara’s work has been featured in many D.C. community events including a recent workshop at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She is currently working on a graphic novel on her coming out story. Stop by her studio from 7-10 pm to meet the artist and see her work in person.

 

Sissy Cutchen

GALLERY 311
SOLO EXHIBITION: SISSY CUTCHEN 

RECEPTION: 7–10 pm, ARTIST TALK: 7:30 pm

Sissy Cutchen is a contemporary American folk artist using found objects in particular windows, furniture, and textiles as her canvases. Her work is happy, whimsical, and fun.

Sissy celebrates the lives and stories of objects and their creators.  She loves to appreciate an item’s history by bringing it into a contemporary value through making it a part of her beautiful folk art. This work is repurposing in its highest form.

Exhibition Statement: “The purpose of this exhibit is to share   Information about marine life. The artist hopes to raise consciousness about sustainable seafood consumption.”

Mason Arts Project Studio: Danielle Dravenstadt

MASON ARTS PROJECT STUDIO (STUDIO 8)
Danielle Dravenstadt

OPEN STUDIO: 7 – 10 pm

 Danielle Dravenstadt is an interdisciplinary artist, specializing in photography, with an MA from the Maryland Institute College of Art and a BA from Furman University. She is an MFA candidate and photography instructor at the School of Art at George Mason University. Her work explores, challenges, and transforms the ordinary through photography, painting, printmaking, and installation, articulating nuanced perceptions of everyday life.

Project Statement: In Tend, Dravenstadt transforms simple gestures of care into radical expressions of acceptance through photography and installation. Dravenstadt builds an aesthetic around the tender engagement with materials of caretakers to make care visible, mentionable, and to provoke a consideration of the transformative potential of practicing care in daily life. 

Art Lounge by the Omi Collective

STUDIO 5: HANDS-ON PROJECTS
The Omi Collective

OPEN STUDIO: 7 – 10 pm

The Omi Collective provides artist-inspired fashion and design products to consumers seeking unique, authentic, and artful items to inspire, and add to, their personal style. They maintain mindful and conscious support for the artists who create them. Stop by Studio 5 for hands-on projects with the artists and see their brand-new mural design on the studio floor.

Post-Grad Artist Talk: Nava Levenson

As her three-month post-grad residency comes to a close, Nava Levenson talks with moderator Leslie Mounaime, Curator of Exhibitions at the Torpedo Factory Art Center, about her experiences during her time at the Torpedo Factory Art Center. Hear her speak about how her residency inspired her work and process, what she’s done during her time, and what she will be doing next.

Join us in the main hall of the Art Center for her talk at 7:00pm and then a mingle and jar opening in the Post-Grad studio #319 after the talk is over.

About the Artist

Nava Levenson is a multidisciplinary artist, instigator, and collaborator based in Richmond, Virginia. She completed her bachelor’s of fine arts in 2017 from James Madison University. Her work investigates anthropological concepts such as hospitality, labor, consumption, and space making. Nava incorporates re-purposed materials in much of her art in an effort to chip away at the surplus of objects that crowd the planet.

During her residency, she plans to invite artists from the Art Center to participate in her ongoing project, Practice Preserves: Studio Dirt. In the same way thrift stores reveal things about American culture, she seeks to archive artists’ practices. She invites people to add studio scraps and discarded material in quart-sized canning jars, which she then opens, catalogs, and photographs for an anthology she hopes to publish. She already received a starter grant from Specto Artspace and this residency will allow her to advance the project.

About the Residency

This competitive juried residency provides meaningful support to emerging artists who have recently completed formal academic training in the visual arts. It is an opportunity to address the critical post-graduation juncture in an emerging artist’s career.

Residents have three months of exclusive access to a studio in the Art Center. Therein, they can create and sell work, interact with the public, and connect with other arts professionals. It’s an opportunity for professional development, networking, and a chance to define a practice outside of the academic context.

Applications are open to recently graduated students who earned a bachelor’s or master’s art degree from an accredited university. Submissions are accepted through Sunday, September 22.